Diet with wrong reason

Top Reasons We Regain Weight & How You Can Stop It To Happen

 

WE LOOK FOR THE FAST TRACK

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Unfortunately, we humans are wired to seek instant gratification. I see this in patients all the time. Even though they’ve already tried a dozen diets, none resulting in lasting weight loss, they are still willing to severely restrict calories and cut out entire food groups if it will help them lose weight. I remind them that if they make changes they can’t sustain, they may lose weight initially, but it will come right back. It’s better to take the time to improve food quality and learn to adjust to hunger and fullness cues.

 

WE SEE A WEIGHT GOAL AS THE FINISH LINE

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A better approach is to set goals around things that you actually have control over, such as consistently exercising five times a week or eating four cups of vegetables each day, and let weight loss be the outcome. Identify your triggers to overeat – stress, fatigue, being overly hungry – and build strategies to deal with them rather than relying on willpower. For example, plan a nutritious afternoon snack, keep tempting foods out of sight and so on. If you have a tendency to eat for emotional reasons, it’s critical to develop non-food ways to comfort yourself.

 

WE DIET FOR THE WRONG REASONS

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Another challenge is that the initial motivators for weight loss – health concerns, an upcoming class reunion, a tropical vacation – often fade. Compliments on your changing appearance and the need to buy smaller pants can keep the motivational fires burning, but what happens when the number on the scale stops moving? Waiting for fresh motivation to strike can cause you to slip back into old habits, but being open to new ways to eat well and stay active can help keep you action-oriented.

 

WE HAVE UNREALISTIC EXPECTATIONS

Diet with wrong reason

How well our expectations match reality can also affect motivation – and the odds of successful weight maintenance. People who are disappointed by how much weight they lost are more likely to regain. So are people who expect that losing weight will make them happier. The truth is that people of all shapes and sizes struggle with body image, relationships and job satisfaction.

 

WE AREN’T FLEXIBLE

Slinky Toy isolated over a plain white background.

It’s also important to expect – and prepare for – life’s inevitable curveballs. People who think in all-or-nothing terms tend to be less adaptable to change and more likely to revert to old habits. This leads to deciding “anything goes” on vacation, skipping exercise if weather or other circumstances pre-empt your normal routine and abandoning healthy eating when life becomes “too busy.” Part of treating health and wellness as a journey includes always having a plan B and being ready to course-correct immediately when life briefly knocks you off track.